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Hallucinations

by Sacks, Oliver, 1933-2015

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Summary

Have you ever seen something that wasn't really there? Heard someone call your name in an empty house? Sensed someone following you and turned around to find nothing? Hallucinations don't belong wholly to the insane. Much more commonly, they are linked to sensory deprivation, intoxication, illness,... Full description

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Summary: Have you ever seen something that wasn't really there? Heard someone call your name in an empty house? Sensed someone following you and turned around to find nothing? Hallucinations don't belong wholly to the insane. Much more commonly, they are linked to sensory deprivation, intoxication, illness, or injury. People with migraines may see shimmering arcs of light or tiny, Lilliputian figures of animals and people. People with failing eyesight, paradoxically, may become immersed in a hallucinatory visual world. Hallucinations can be brought on by a simple fever or even the act of waking or falling asleep, when people have visions ranging from luminous blobs of color to beautifully detailed faces or terrifying ogres. Those who are bereaved may receive comforting "visits" from the departed. In some conditions, hallucinations can lead to religious epiphanies or even the feeling of leaving one's own body. Humans have always sought such life-changing visions, and for thousands of years have used hallucinogenic compounds to achieve them. As a young doctor in California in the 1960s, Oliver Sacks had both a personal and a professional interest in psychedelics. These, along with his early migraine experiences, launched a lifelong investigation into the varieties of hallucinatory experience. Here, with his usual elegance, curiosity, and compassion, Dr. Sacks weaves together stories of his patients and of his own mind-altering experiences to illuminate what hallucinations tell us about the organization and structure of our brains, how they have influenced every culture's folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all, a vital part of the human condition. Permissions Acknowledgments Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following for permission to reprint previously published material: American Academy of Neurology: Excerpt from "Anton's Syndrome Accompanying Withdrawal Hallucinosis in a Blind Alcoholic" by Barbara E. Swartz and John C. M. Brust from Neurology 34 (1984). Reprinted by permission of the American Academy of Neurology as administered by Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research. American Psychiatric Publishing: Excerpt from "Weir Mitchell's Visual Hallucinations as a Grief Reaction" by Jerome S. Schneck, M.D., from American Journal of Psychiatry (1989). Copyright © 1989 by American Journal of Psychiatry. Reprinted by permission of American Psychiatric Publishing a division of American Psychiatric Association. BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.: Excerpt from "Heautoscopy, Epilepsy and Suicide" by P. Brugger, R. Agosti, M. Regard, H. G. Wieser and T. Landis from Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, July 1, 1994. Reprinted by permission of BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. as administered by the Copyright Clearance Center. Cambridge University Press: Excerpts from Disturbances of the Mind by Douwe Draaisma, translated by Barbara Fasting. Copyright © 2006 by Douwe Draaisma. Reprinted by permission of Cambridge University Press. Canadian Psychological Association: Excerpt from "Effects of Decreased Variation of the Sensory Environment" by W. H. Bexton, W. Heron and T. H. Scott from Canadian Psychology (1954). Copyright © 1954 by Canadian Psychological Association. Excerpt from "Perceptual Changes after Prolonged Sensory Isolation (Darkness and Silence)" by John P. Zubek, Dolores Pushkar, Wilma Sansom and J. Gowing from Canadian Psychology (1961). Copyright © 1961 by Canadian Psychological Association. Reprinted by permission of Canadian Psychological Association. Elsevier...
Item Description: Unabridged.
Physical Description: 1 online resource (8 audio files) : digital
Playing Time: 09::4:9:
Format: Requires OverDrive Listen (file size: N/A KB) or OverDrive app (file size: 276291 KB).
ISBN: 9780307967350
Author Notes: Oliver Sacks was born in London, England on July 9, 1933. He received a medical degree from Queen's College, Oxford University and performed his internship at Middlesex Hospital in London and Mount Zion Hospital in San Francisco. He completed his residency at UCLA.

In 1965, he became a clinical neurologist to the Little Sisters of the Poor and Beth Abraham Hospital. His work in a Bronx charity hospital led him to write the book Awakenings in 1973. The book inspired a play by Harold Pinter and became a film starring Robert De Niro and Robin Williams. His other works included An Anthropologist on Mars, The Mind's Eye, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Uncle Tungsten, Musicophilia, A Leg to Stand On, On the Move: A Life, and Gratitude.

In 2007, he ended his 42-year relationship with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine to accept an interdisciplinary teaching position at Columbia. In 2012, he returned to the New York University School of Medicine as a professor of neurology. He died of cancer on August 30, 2015 at the age of 82.

(Bowker Author Biography) He was born in London & educated in London, Oxford & California. he practices neurology in New York City, where he is also a clinical professor neurology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine & an adjunct professor of neurology at the NYU School of Medicine. He has received the Hawthornden Prize, a Polk Award & a Guggenheim fellowship.

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