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Night draws near : Iraq's people in the shadow of America's war

by Shadid, Anthony.

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From the only journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting from Iraq, an account of ordinary people caught between the struggles of nations. The Washington Post's Shadid went to Iraq, neither embedded with soldiers nor briefed by politicians. Because he is fluent in Arabic, Shadid--an Arab A... Full description

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Summary: From the only journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting from Iraq, an account of ordinary people caught between the struggles of nations. The Washington Post's Shadid went to Iraq, neither embedded with soldiers nor briefed by politicians. Because he is fluent in Arabic, Shadid--an Arab American born and raised in Oklahoma--was able to disappear into the divided, dangerous worlds of Iraq. Day by day, as the American dream of freedom clashed with Arab notions of justice, he pieced together the human story of ordinary Iraqis weathering the terrible dislocations and tragedies of war. Through the lives of men and women, Sunnis and Shiites, American sympathizers and outraged young jihadists newly transformed into martyrs, Shadid shows us the journey of defiant, hopeful, resilient Iraq, and how Saddam's downfall paved the way not only for democracy but also for an Islamic reawakening and jihad.--From publisher description.
Physical Description: xiv, 424 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. [399]-401) and index.
ISBN: 0805076026
Author Notes: Anthony Shadid was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on September 26, 1968. He received a bachelor's degree in political science and journalism from the University of Wisconsin in 1990. He worked at several newspapers during his lifetime including The Associated Press, The Globe, The Washington Post, and The New York Times. In 2010, he and three other New York Times journalists were kidnapped in Libya by Colonel Muammar el-Qaddafi's forces. They were held for six days and beaten before being released. He won Pulitzer Prizes in 2004 and 2010 for work he did while at The Washington Post. The New York Times nominated him, along with a team of his colleagues, for the 2012 Pulitzer in international reporting.

He also was the author of Legacy of the Prophet: Despots, Democrats and the New Politics of Islam; Night Draws Near: Iraq's People in the Shadow of America's War; and House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East. He died from an asthma attack on February 16, 2012 at the age of 43.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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